Sharing insights since 2007 on carefully saving money, investing, frugal living, coupons, promo codes because the little things matter in achieving financial freedom!


Marc Anthony is credited with saying “do what you love, and you’ll never work a day in your life.” Many successful motivational speakers and businessmen like Warren Buffett tells young people to choose the job they’d pick if they didn’t need the money too.

But is it true? Does pursuit of a dream job always lead to success? There are plenty of people who don’t think so, and they’d warn you that blindly following this advice could not only lead to disillusionment, but becoming the proverbial “starving artist.”

Let’s face it – some of us have passions that aren’t very lucrative, but are rather known for low wages and long hours. Another problem is that most people’s dream careers fall within the same categories: the arts, environmental causes, and the nonprofit sector. This means highly competitive job markets that requires you to be extremely qualified and well-connected to be able to do what you love.

Skeptics of the “do what you love” mentality remind people that the definition of work is what you do to pay for the time and resources to do what you love. This doesn’t mean you should choose a boring 9 to 5 and settle for dreading Mondays, though. I think it’s possible to find a comfortable compromise between the two, and here’s how I recommend doing it.
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One of the most exciting times of everyone’s life is entering the real word as a young adult. Finishing school, getting that first full time job, and venturing out on your own is always an important milestone everyone remembers. It signifies the start of adulthood and finally not being “a kid”. However, for many, the excitement wears off pretty quickly and you then get hit with one of the harshest realities of being an adult: managing your own finances.

Why is it so hard?

Budgeting and learning how to spend your money wisely for the first time is a challenge for everyone. And you’re bound to make mistakes. To make your transition easier, here are four tips to help you survive budgeting in the real world for the first time:
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healthy eating

Ramen noodles may be cheap, but they sure don’t offer much in the way of nutrition. In fact, it seems that all the affordable foods in the grocery store are pretty bad for you.

However, there are ways to maintain a healthy diet for less. It takes some commitment and a little creative cooking, but these ten tips below should help you out:

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shelter-in-place
A month ago, nearly everyone would doubt you if you declared that the world will eventually all work at home.

Yet here we are.

Just a few short weeks later, with everybody instantly converted to telecommuting.

The world changed overnight. How are you coping?

Are you going crazy trying to be an unqualified school teacher with many kids in the house these days? Or do you feel lonely with the sudden lack of social interaction?

Are you glued to the constant news about coronavirus and the stock market? Or are you too busy trying to look for another job because you were recently let go?

No matter your circumstances, everybody can use a bit more money in their pockets right now.

And while increasing income is likely out of the question for practically all of the world’s population, we can always work on reducing our expenses.

Here is a reminder of some common sense but very effective ways you can save some money starting today.

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coronavirus recession

Recessions are the perfect time to start a business: FedEx, Microsoft, Burger King and even GE were started during the recessions the U.S. has experienced over the last century and a half.

If you’ve been thinking about starting a new business, the fact that the economy is down should not stop you. In fact, there are many reasons why the national economic situation should encourage you to start a new business now.

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early bird finances
There’s a reason many people quote the saying “the early bird gets the worm”. In the world of personal finance, getting a jump on the day can mean saving money and time, which often saves you even more money.

Let’s look today at how doing a few things in the morning rather than afternoon or evening could literally save you hundreds of dollars in the long run.

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Personal & Family Finance | USU

Sun Apr 5 , 2020
The finance resources you will find here are unbiased, researched, and reliable. Experts are available in your county, as well as expert advice which is published at our “Utah Money Moms” website and social media. We also provide the tools to help manage your finances for free; PowerPay is a nationally […]